Thursday, December 11, 2008

News Producer Blasts Snow Coverage

At the NBC affiliate in Chicago, they let the morning producer have a short commentary. It's quite funny, but is it true? I'd love to hear your comments on snow coverage and how does it differ from severe weather coverage? Click the comments page to voice your thoughts. Feel free to check "anonymous"....



8 comments:

Andrew said...

Its depends on the amount of snow and and what happens before it snows, but snow can turn out to be a severe weather event. Here in College City I have no clue what is happening in Jonesboro or walnut Ridge unless it is covered by local media, if the roads are closed or icy I don't want to be on them and sometimes the only way to find this out is if KAIT covers it. So I guess I am saying YES snow events do need to be covered because if they weren't we wouldn't know what was happening other than outside our own windows.

Patrick said...

I don't object to how "snow stories" are covered, should it snow in our area. I have however noticed a trend by meteorologist in this area to "downplay" any snow chance that we may have or God forbid, any accumulation predictions. Not all of us will panic if we here the "S" word in a forecast and run to the store for milk and bread. Some of us may even get excited at the prospect of snow while at the same time keeping it in the proper perspective. Personally, I love tracking storm systems and what they may bring. It gets old having to go to other sources to get the real picture of a forecast without the "downplay spin" that so many meteorologist feel they must include to prevent the panic that they assume is inevitable. Whether it be Severe weather or a snow forecast, just give us the facts! Most of us can handle it and will know, using common sense, whether it is appropriate or not to "get excited". Thanks.

Anonymous said...

We don't ever get any snow in Montgomery, AL. So we hang on every word when the "S" word is mentioned. When your not used to it people go CRAZY. I do understand where he is coming from when he talked about them telling us it is snowing or has snowed. That happens down here with the rain. Miss you Ryanm hope you and your family have a very Merry CHRISTmas!!

Angie
Montgomery, AL

Jason said...

Winter Weather is just as important in my eyes. I would bet as many people die from Snow/Ice/Cold every year as Severe Weather "mostly wrecks". Winter weather also cost millions of dollars worth of damage. Winter weather can be very dangerous, just like severe. They both need to be covered.

Anonymous said...

Hey its all good. Merry Christmas!

Vonavie said...

I haven't read the other comments yet. But I think that for us here, snow coverage is less frequent and so therefore more news worthy. Would I want my normal TV shows interupted for it, no.

That is where I differ on Severe Weather. PLEASE interupt my shows whenever you feel necessary for Severe Weather for as long as you feel necessary.

Do I think it takes more meteorology expertese (sp?) to be a weather person in an extreme weather prone area? Absolutely, and, I think the KAIT8 team is fantastic!

Thank you Ryan, you have a great team!

memwxnet said...

Ryan - Interesting vid. Being a Mid-South Met, I think the TV shows do a good job of coverage for these types of events, though I also see the "downplay spin" mentioned by Patrick, since I have access (and knowledge of interpreting) the raw data all Mets look at. That's why my forecast on MemphisWeather.net has no spin - I tell it like it is and if I'm wrong, so be it.

Having said that, I know how fast-paced Memphians react to the 'S' word and I could just as easily justify some downspin, unless there is a fairly high certainty in the event (which is very difficult to obtain in this part of the country relative to winter weather). In more rural areas, I think the reaction to a snow forecast is probably more subdued than it is in the big city.

My $0.02. Thanks for sharing the video!

--Erik, www.MemphisWeather.net

Erica said...

I grew up in Kalamazoo, MI where we got snow, quite often in fact. We were on the East side of the state so we also got plenty of lake effect snow. It did get rather annoying when broadcasters treated snow as if it were a surprise. When I was growing up though (in the 80's and 90's I might add), they didn't shut down schools, churches, businesses, daycares, and such. But, now, they get 5 inches of snow and everything is shut down. I don't know what it is, whether they aren't taking care of the roads as much or if the roads built now don't handle the snow and ice as well as they used to. Who knows. It was very common for us to still have school when it had snowed 3 ft. since we got there that morning! Point is, down here- yes, bring on the snow coverage! In places like Chicago where they are quite used to seeing snow, why not just tell the estimated snowfall and be done with it? Or, tell if there is iced mixed in, as that plays a large part in the road conditions. Ryan, I think you do a great job in not only informing us of the forecast but your blog really helps us to know why your forecast may differ (and be more accurate, I might add) then others.